Limited federal response to reduce radon contamination in housing
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Limited federal response to reduce radon contamination in housing statement of John H. Luke, Associate Director, Resources, Community and Economic Development Division before the Subcommittee on Superfund and Environmental Oversight, Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate by John H Luke

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Published by U.S. General Accounting Office in [Washington, D.C.?] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Radon -- Environmental aspects -- United States,
  • Housing -- Environmental aspects -- United States,
  • Housing and health -- United States

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesTestimony -- GAO/T-RCED-88-43
ContributionsUnited States. General Accounting Office
The Physical Object
Pagination7 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14901502M

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Limited federal response to reduce radon contamination in housing: statement of John H. Luke, Associate Director, Resources, Community and Economic Development Division before the Subcommittee on Superfund and Environmental Oversight, Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate. April INDOOR RADON ’ Limited Federal Response to Reduce Contamination in Housing BEsm~Nuttobem~~autsi&~&nerat Accounting Office except on the basis of the specific approd by the Oflice of Congressional Relations. Despite the known threat of radon, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and public housing agencies have failed to test for radon and/or failed .   Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking. If you smoke and live in a home with high radon levels, you increase your risk of developing lung cancer. Having your home tested is the only effective way to determine whether you and your family are at risk of high radon exposure.

Radon is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, responsible for o lung cancer deaths each year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. You can take steps to reduce high radon levels in your home. Testing your home is the only effective way to find out if you have a radon problem. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development | 7th Street S.W., Washington, DC Telephone: () TTY: () New Federal requirements are designed to minimize the risks of radon exposure for condo and apartment dwellers. Helping to reduce hazardous radon gas in condos and apartments has long been a major goal of federal agencies such as the Dept. of Housing & Urban Development, the Dept. of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Dept. of Health and Human . The higher the radon concentrations, the sooner action should be taken to reduce levels to as low as practically possible. While the health risk from radon exposure below the Canadian Guideline is small there is no level that is considered risk free. It is the choice of each homeowner to decide what level of radon exposure they are willing to.

Radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is associated with lung cancer, is found in rental properties throughout the U.S. To meet the responsibility to provide tenants habitable rentals, landlords must address radon problems that occur in rental e the gas is invisible and odorless, however, it’s not always easy to know if radon is present, unlike other. Radon and the Landlord's Duty to MatJitam Premises There are currently no federal or state laws that address directly the responsibility of landlords to reduce high radon levels in their properties Thus, absent legislative action, the main avenue for finding a legal duty on the part of landlords to fix radon problems is under an existing. Housing agencies can neglect radon because HUD doesn’t require them to do testing on the nation’s 1 million public housing units. The most the federal housing department did was to “strongly encourage” local authorities to test in HUD never bothered to see if anyone listened. So The Oregonian/OregonLive checked. Radon gas is the largest source of radiation exposure to the general public (Darby et al., ), and exposure to radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer death among smokers and nonsmokers. Lung cancer has the lowest 5-year survivability rate of all the cancers lives per year are lost in the U.S. due to lung cancers.